Better Blocker: two year review and thoughts on the future


#1

I just wrote up a little post on my blog reviewing what we‘ve achieved in the past two years with Better Blocker, where I feel we‘ve fallen short, and what I’d like to see us do, going forward:


#2

Thank you for the summary, @Aral. Great to get these insights. :slight_smile:
I myself would be totally fine with a yearly subscription donation for example, I know that you guys need to run Better somehow and that it costs a lot. I am more than willing to support apps with the right mindset and yours is way at the top of that list.
Keep up the great work!


#3

Thanks for the update and Indie’s ongoing commitment to Better. Much appreciated!

The model you’re thinking about indeed sounds interesting but risky. The one thing I have to think about since reading your post is whether and under which circumstances enough people would chose to subscribe.

Here are some thoughts I’ve had so far

  • I would prefer an option to pay annually instead of monthly
  • Finding a good price is probably relatively hard because to cross-finance those who won’t contribute, the contributors might have to pay a relatively high and maybe prohibitive price
  • What about offering different price points for different income groups / levels of willingness of support?
  • Is there or could there be something not related to the core blocker functionality that could be offered as a perk to subscribers in order to make a subscription more attractive? Just as an example from another app, the creator of a free OTP app offers the ability to use custom images for the stored accounts when you’ve bought it

#4

IMHO making the service free would make sense only if:

a) you think you can significantly improve the service by the mere fact
of having many more people using it (which is not the case, I think)

and

b) you can afford a massive PR campaign that will tell everybody that
everybody is using it, to the point that everybody eventually will.

If not, I’m afraid “freemium” works only for VC-backed ventures.


#5

Also … broadening the supported browsers / OS list could be really useful. Being limited to only one browser is … limiting.
Also, Mozilla is investing in users’ privacy and little by little they are going in the same direction of you tu: empower users’ privacy!


#6

Also, Mozilla is investing in users’ privacy and little by little they are going in the same direction of you tu: empower users’ privacy!

Prove it. Seems that little by little Mozilla takes it away as well. This seems to work on Macs (plus provides some hints for minimizing tracking in Windoz). HTH.

https://www.askvg.com/tip-disable-telemetry-and-data-collection-in-mozilla-firefox-quantum/


#7

Never worried about that since I always send them the data of my browsing. There’s no evidence they sell it to anybody or uses them in other ways than own software development.


#8

There’s no evidence they sell it to anybody or uses them in other ways than own software development.

Granted when testing & debugging a new plugin for FF, telemetry & experiments could be quite useful (or for the Mozilla team as well). Developers should set those about:config URLs to some server on their local LAN.
Why doesn’t FF have telemetry & experiments turned OFF by default? I consider it unsavory and virtually nefarious that when I turn off these data collection switches, telemetry & experiments are still ACTIVE.

FF_DataC

The fewer turds you, we, I leave on centralized servers, the better. Data has a way of sitting somewhere a long time until some Consultants come in to help the company save head-count and consolidate all the companies “old” data. Mix internal data with 3rd party data, stir in a little AI and good profiles can be obtained.